Posts Tagged ‘dog bites’

Dog Bites Increase

Friday, December 3rd, 2010

Headlines read: “Man’s best friend? Severe dog bite injuries have increased”1

The article goes on to state that dog bites incidents grew by 86% from 1993 to 2008. We really need to be asking ourselves why this is happen. Dogs are our best friends. No other animal can be the companion that a dog can be. Reading stories like this is very upsetting to me. A dog can be everything to us, given the opportunity. Is that where we are going wrong? Are we not giving the dog’s the right opportunity?

Our lives have become so complicated. There seems to not be the time for a dog. This actually makes it even more important to train your dog. Start that training at a young age. Help to bring your dog up correctly so that he/she fits into your lifestyle so that he/she can be part of that lifestyle. Make a commitment and follow it through.

Using a dog trainer that teaches you how to teach your dog is important. That way, you have an understanding on how to communicate with your dog in all situations. Communication leads to understanding the role your dog needs to play in that situation.

Then we, as humans, have become used to having everything happen quickly in this electronic age. We have failed to progress in how we raise our dogs though. We now use computers and cell phones to help raise our children but we still expect to give the dogs a treat and expect them to follow though with the rest of the communication. I’m not saying that treats do not work, what I am saying is that a treat needs more than just giving it to the dog for it to work. It takes more time to communicate with that treat. Why should we not move forward in the electronic age with our dogs?

The technology is available. Remote (shock) collars are are a great way to communicate with your dog. You just need to find a trainer that uses them as a communication tool. There are many trainers out there that have studied to expand their knowledge on how to use the remote collar as a communication tool.

Let’s start working on decreasing the bite statistics.
1.) Make the commitment to your dog – train him/her to fit your lifestyle.
2.) Do not leave your dog unattended unless in a kennel.
3.) Teach your children not to approach a strange dog.

These 3 things will decrease the bite statistics considerably.

1.http://www.latimes.com/health/boostershots/la-heb-dog-bite-20101202,0,3917303.story

The Dawg Trainer Visits Central Elementary School – Dog Safety for Children

Wednesday, July 16th, 2008

Jilly and I were invited to speak at Central Elementary School on July 10th. I had a very hard time thinking up what to talk about to the children of the school until I started doing some research. I found that 50% – 75% of dog bites reported in the United States each year were children. I know from personal experience that most children do not know how to approach a strange dog. I can remember a trip to PetsMart with one of my dogs where a child came running up from behind my dog and I and grabbed him around the back legs and gave him a hug, resting her head on his back. Thank goodness I heard her coming and I had a well trained dog with me or that could have become a scary situation. I have not had an adult do something like this yet, but I have had adults make the wrong decision when it comes to approaching a strange dog. I believe everyone could use a refresher course in safety.

Statistics show that there are common patterns surrounding dog bites. A few of these patterns include: more than one dog, a dog is in the backyard at a neighbor’s, no adult supervision, and the dog is normally kept on a chain or a rope.

There are many ways to keep a child safe around strange dogs. Talk to your children about these safety steps:
1. Always stay calm around dogs. Do not make loud noises or sudden moves. Talk softly.
2. Do not run up to a dog.
3. Do not hug a strange dog.
4. Do not put your face near a dog’s face.
5. Do not touch a dog that is growling, showing his teeth or barking alot.
6. Only approach a dog when a grown up is around and watching.
7. Do not take toys or food away from a dog.
8. Do not bother a dog when it is sleeping.
9. Do not pull a dog’s tail, fur or ears and do not poke at a dog through a fence or with a stick.
10. When a dog approaches you, stand still and quiet. Keep your hands at your side and allow the dog to sniff you.
11. Do not run away from a dog that is chasing you. Stand like a tree. If the dog knocks you down, curl up in a ball with your arms over your face and head.
12. Avoid eye contact with dogs that are barking loudly, showing their teeth or growling. Back off slowly and walk away.
13. Always ask the dog’s owner if you can pet their dog.
14. If the owner says yes, slowly reach towards the dog and make a fist so the dog can sniff your hand and then pet the dog under the chin.

The Humane Society of the United States has a Dos and Don’ts coloring page to help your children spot the proper responses and improper behaviors. The American Veterinary Medical Association has a Yes or No Picture Page to help your children practice their new knowledge of dog safety. Also check places like Dog Bite Law, Kids and Dogs: Safety First, and Kids and Dogs Safety Tip Sheet.

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