Poor Puppy!

What a great winter we have been having! Nice temperatures – not to hot, not to cold. Catch and I have been able to stay on the road without worrying about the weather affecting the temperature in the vehicle we are driving.

After the terrible weather last winter, I wanted to be ready for this winter. I started in September looking for an other car with 4 wheel drive since the Bravada was on it’s last leg. The TDT (The Dawg Trainer) van does great in the snow but it only has so much clearance. I bought a used Ford Explorer. Nice truck. Sits high enough that I can clear any snow drifts in the 1/2 mile driveway to the black top so that Catch and I can get around. Plus, I can still get up to 4 crates in there to carry more dogs.

Usually, if you see me, you see Catch. He’s kinda hard to miss. Catch is a 90 pound Giant Schnauzer pup. Even though he is 1.5 years old, I still call Catch a pup since he is not done growing yet. I did find it interesting when Catch and I would take the Ford, that I would find more people around the Ford than the TDT van. I guess the windows are not as dark in the Ford as they are in the van. And maybe it has something to do with the van having signage on it and the Ford does not. I suppose in the winter time, people do not hear me approach the vehicle as well as any other time of the year either. I started hearing things like “poor dog”, “poor puppy”. At first, I just let it go. Then finally, I had to ask. I apparently was missing something! Why were people feeling sorry for my pup?!? You would be surprised at the answers! At least I was surprised. People felt sorry for my dog because he was left in the car. They felt he would have been better off at home. I was at Rural King one day and see 2 separate people approach someone else’s vehicle and do the same thing. Their reasoning? They felt sorry for a dog trapped in a car. Let me throw in a disclaimer here too: every time this has happened the temperatures were nice. Both vehicles had their windows down enough for ventilation. In the case of the dog “trapped” in the car at Rural King, his windows were all the way down and the people were actually petting the dog (that is for another blog post :-)).

Trapped? To me, trapped means to not be able to get out of. Like a land slide or a collapsed building – maybe being in jail or even house arrest! Catch must not be under house arrest since he is not in the house, right?

Catch is a trained dog. He is reliable on and off leash. Catch likes to go for rides. In fact, you can not say the “G” “O” word in front of him or he runs to the door and is ready to go! He will race you to the car and then dance around watching you to see which car you are headed to so he can beat you to that one. He then sits and waits at the door he normally uses to enter the car until you release him with the command he knows which tells him to get into the car. He rides well – rather the trip is only 10 minutes long or 10 hours long. I can leave him in my car without worrying about him eating a seat or the dash! Life is good!

Catch is not trapped in life. Being a trained dog opens the door for many adventures for the dog and his/her owner. Catch is able to go into stores that allow dogs, sit on a patio and have dinner with me or go to a BBQ with friends or family. I can be gone for hours and not have to worry about whether Catch needs out – has enough water – is hungry – all because he is right there with me, enjoying life, meeting new people, going on adventures.

All dogs should be as trapped as Catch.

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